Saturday, August 14, 2010

Quote It Saturday 8/14

Happy Saturday!  Ken's home, the party is over, and we have a weekend ahead of us with nothing scheduled - ahhhh!  And Jamie is even feeling OK this morning after being up late running around with his friends.

I just finished a remarkable book this week for my library's book discussion (which, by the way, was the highlight of my week!).  I'm probably the last person on earth who hadn't read it yet: Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden.  Despite all the amazing reviews and recommendations I'd heard, I just didn't think it sounded interesting.  Boy, was I wrong!

Golden is a very talented writer, and the book pulled me in from the very first pages and had me rooting for its main character, a young Japanese girl.  It's one of those books that completely transports you to a different time and place.  Besides the in-depth characters, fascinating plot and setting, and thought-provoking issues, the book is also beautifully written.  I tabbed a bunch of favorite quotes.  Here's one where the main character is musing about the changes in her life over which she had no control:

...and, of course, I couldn't stop thinking of the other life I'd once led.  Grief is a most peculiar thing; we're so helpless in the face of it.  It's like a window that will simply open of its own accord.  The room grows cold, and we can do nothing but shiver.  But it opens a little less each time, and a little less; and one day we wonder what has become of it.
          - Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
Besides being beautiful prose, this quote really hit me.  I feel much the same way about my own grief over the life I once led before CFS.  In the early days of my illness, that grief was overwhelming, but over the years it has faded.  I sometimes still feel a pang of regret that I can't exercise or have a beer with my husband or do all the things I want to do, but the hard, painful grief has lessened its grip over the years, as I've become more accustomed to my new life.  It is what it is.  This is my life now.

What do you think?  Has it been the same for you?  Or are you still shivering in the cold?

Enjoy the weekend!

7 comments:

  1. I also read the book and agree with your review. The book was much better than the movie, as is usually the case.

    Your quote about grief also echoes my own experience. I once was a nurse practitioner and that was my identity. It's taken a while to develop one that is not tied to a profession. However,I feel mentally and psychically stronger and more whole now that I have finished grieving for what nurses diagnose as "loss of role."

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great quote, Sue. Most days, my grief is not so noticeable, and then bam! Something triggers it and it hits me again. Go figure. Just a reminder that I never quite have a handle on this thing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Excellent quote, Sue. You asked a question about if we were still shivering in the cold.
    Grief used to be heavy and it would return tenfold when I would yet experience another loss...especially becoming homebound. But now, it is only periodically that it comes to visit and I may cry or feel sad a bit, but mostly it passes quickly.
    And it is so true...we have little control over when it surfaces...it just does. Lovely quote, Sue...thought provoking.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Renee & Shelli -

    Yes, grief does sometimes sneak up on us out of the blue...though less and less often for me as time goes on.

    Ellie -
    Glad you enjoyed the book, too. I can't believe I waited so long to read it! Yes, I agree that loss of role is a big issue for all of us with CFS. I, too, had a professional career tied to my identity. Glad to hear you feel stronger and more whole these days!

    Sue

    ReplyDelete
  5. Renee & Shelli -

    Yes, grief does sometimes sneak up on us out of the blue...though less and less often for me as time goes on.

    Ellie -
    Glad you enjoyed the book, too. I can't believe I waited so long to read it! Yes, I agree that loss of role is a big issue for all of us with CFS. I, too, had a professional career tied to my identity. Glad to hear you feel stronger and more whole these days!

    Sue

    ReplyDelete
  6. You wrote: Besides being beautiful prose, this quote really hit me. I feel much the same way about my own grief over the life I once led before CFS. In the early days of my illness, that grief was overwhelming, but over the years it has faded.

    My response: You took the words right out of my mouth! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  7. I haven't read this either, and for the same reasons. Now, if I see it in the library i'm bound to pick it up.

    The grief quote hit home for me too, but it's not about my CFS at the moment. With all the counselling I've had this year I'm now, at last, grieving for earlier losses. At times it feels like a mountain of grief but it is miraculous. Your quote reminded me there will be an end to the pain.

    ReplyDelete